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April 15, 2012

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Timaldiss

Wow. Great read, and thanks for laying out so clearly lots of answers to some of the thoughts that I haven't had time to fully form in my own mind :)

Will Davies

Thanks, Timaldiss!

Ian C

So brilliant I've sent you a personal email to say as much.

Gunther

A number of my friends are in line to be 'Olympic Ambassadors', which I would no more be inclined to do than volunteer in McDonalds.

The tragedy is the Olympic 'brand' does still have enough power that it COULD act as a significant focal point for a real, grass-roots, Big Society, if only it were not so unapologetically, transnationally, tax-efficiently corporate itself.

Dick Pountain

Hence, much of what Tony Blair claimed to stand for - 'more money in your pocket, less crime on the streets, better public services' - wasn't actually a set of policies or political values at all, seeing as nobody could sensibly disagree with any of it.

But what about the not insignificant chunk of the population that is not "sensible". The same problem afflicts Kantian accounts of virtue that talk about propositions everyone can "reasonably" agree on. Most of us are unreasonable some of the time, some all of the time.

Jbrittholbrook

This really is a well-done post. Love the reference to Bataille here (as well as the title of the blog, I suppose).

I've become an instant fan. Thanks to @DrDaveOBrien for pointing me here!

Michael

Will,

Rather late on this, but I also want to say thank you - your piece expertly analyses and expresses my various inchoate suspicions and dissatisfactions with the Big Society. Great stuff!

Like many of us I suspect, these days I see or receive communications asking me to volunteer my time. Invariably (so far)the communication always comes from a paid employee. Unlike the drudge and slog, comms won't be volunteered out any time soon.

Will Davies

Thanks, all!

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